Tag Archives: hegemony

Radical Thinkers: Steffen Böhm Presents Hegemony and Socialist Strategy by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe

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4 Mar 20147:00 pm | Studio | £5.00

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Steffen Böhm is Director of the Essex Sustainability Institute and Professor in Management and Sustainability at the University of Essex. His research focuses on political economies and ecologies of organization, management and the environment. He was a co-founder of the open-access journal ephemera: theory & politics in organization, and is co-founder and co-editor of the new open-access publishing press MayFlyBooks as well as Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements. He has published three books: Repositioning Organization Theory, Against Automobility, and Upsetting the Offset: The Political Economy of Carbon Markets.
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ORGANIZING RESISTANCE MOVEMENTS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF POLITICAL DISCOURSE THEORY

Abstract: The main purpose of this paper is to explore the possibility of articulating Political Discourse Theory(PDT) together with Organizational Studies (OS), while using the opportunity to introduce PDT to thoseOS scholars who have not yet come across it. The bulk of this paper introduces the main concepts ofPDT, discussing how they have been applied to concrete, empirical studies of resistance movements.In recent years, PDT has been increasingly appropriated by OS scholars to problematize and analyzeresistances and other forms of social antagonisms within organizational settings, taking the relationaland contingent aspects of struggles into consideration. While the paper supports the idea of a jointarticulation of PDT and OS, it raises a number of critical questions of how PDT concepts have beenempirically used to explain the organization of resistance movements. The paper sets out a researchagenda for how both PDT and OS can together contribute to our understanding of new, emerging or- ganizational forms of resistance movements.

Becoming Global (Un)Civil Society: Counter- Hegemonic Struggle and the Indymedia Network

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Abstract: In this article we ask how ‘civil society’ actors and organizations can become constructed and treated as ‘uncivil society’. We contest the notion that ‘uncivil’ necessarily equates with the dark qualities of violence and organized criminality. Instead, we take a Gramscian perspective in suggesting that what becomes ‘uncivil’ is any practice and organization that substantially contests the structuring enclosures of hegemonic order, of which civil society is a necessary part. To trace this, we consider ways in which a global grass-roots media network called Indymedia has established and maintained itself as a counter-hegemonic media-producing organization. In this case, a conscious positioning and self-identification as counter-hegemonic has been accompanied by the framing and sometimes violent policing of nodes and practices of this network as ‘uncivil’ by cooperating state authorities. This is in the absence of association of this network with organized violence or crime. We intend our reflections to contribute to a deepening theorization of the terms ‘civil’ and ‘uncivil’ as they are becoming used in social movement and globalization studies.

full text available on Academia.edu

Infra-political dimensions of resistance to international business: A Neo-Gramscian approach

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Abstract: This paper contributes to critical understandings of how international business is resisted. It develops a Neo-Gramscian approach that emphasizes the importance of informal or ‘infra-political’ processes. Current conceptualizations demonstrate how international business is challenged via formal and organized political strategies in the firm, the state and civil society. The infra-political dimension is understated. This paper develops a theory of ‘articulation’ that broadens our understandings of how international business is resisted in both formal and informal ways.

full text available on Academia.edu

Marketing the hegemony of development: of pulp fictions and green deserts

greendesertbrazil2Abstract: In this paper we analyze the role of marketing in the construction of what can be called the hegemony of development. Through an investigation of the marketing practices of the pulp and paper industry in South America and the resistances that are articulated by a range of civil society actors against the expansion of this industry, we problematize marketing as a political and contested discourse and practice. By using Laclau and Mouffe’s (1985, 2001) theoretical framework, which is centered on the concept of ‘hegemony’, we highlight the crucial role marketing plays in the social and cultural legitimation of the highly controversial development of the pulp and paper industry – regarded as one of the most polluting industries in the world – in South America. We build on existing ‘critical marketing’ literatures to critique marketing’s role in spreading ‘development’ practices around the world, and we introduce Laclau and Mouffe’s theories to the marketing field in order to understand better the way marketing helps to produce ‘development’ as a hegemonic discourse in a particular social and cultural field. In this way we contribute to a growing understanding that critical marketing research is not only about exposing and analyzing the discourses and practices that drive consumption. Rather, we see marketing as an ontological discourse and practice that is crucial for the cultural and social legitimation of the development of entire industries and economic spheres.

full text available on Academia.edu

Moving Management: Theorizing Struggles against the Hegemony of Management

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Abstract: How do groups resist the apparently all-encompassing discourse of management? Rejecting current theories of resistance as ‘re-appropriation’ or ‘micro-politics’, we argue that resistance may be thought about as hegemonic struggle undertaken by social movements. We identify four major resistance movements that engage with management: unions, organizational misbehaviour, civic movements and civic movement organizations. We argue that these forms of resistance differ in terms of location (civil society or workplace) and strategy (political or infra-political). We chart out the possible interconnections between these different modes of resistance and detail how these interconnections are established. By doing this, the paper provides a framework for understanding the many forms of resistance movements that seek to disrupt the hegemonic discourse of management.

full text available on Academia.edu